Bad Company Gold Map – Australian Gold Blazin.

Bad Company Gold Map

bad company gold map

    bad company

  • Bad Company are an English rock supergroup founded in 1973, consisting of band members from Free (singer Paul Rodgers, drummer Simon Kirke), Mott the Hoople (guitarist Mick Ralphs), and King Crimson (bassist Boz Burrell).
  • Bad Company is a 1931 drama film directed by Tay Garnett and written by Jack Lait. It stars Helen Twelvetrees and Ricardo Cortez.
  • Bad Company is a 1972 American Western film directed by Robert Benton, who also co-wrote the film with David Newman.

    gold

  • An alloy of this
  • made from or covered with gold; “gold coins”; “the gold dome of the Capitol”; “the golden calf”; “gilded icons”
  • A yellow precious metal, the chemical element of atomic number 79, valued esp. for use in jewelry and decoration, and to guarantee the value of currencies
  • A deep lustrous yellow or yellow-brown color
  • coins made of gold
  • amber: a deep yellow color; “an amber light illuminated the room”; “he admired the gold of her hair”

    map

  • a diagrammatic representation of the earth’s surface (or part of it)
  • Record in detail the spatial distribution of (something)
  • make a map of; show or establish the features of details of; “map the surface of Venus”
  • function: (mathematics) a mathematical relation such that each element of a given set (the domain of the function) is associated with an element of another set (the range of the function)
  • Represent (an area) on a map; make a map of
  • Associate (a group of elements or qualities) with an equivalent group, according to a particular formula or model

bad company gold map – 10 From

10 From 6 (Greatest Hits)
10 From 6 (Greatest Hits)
Originally released in 1985, this multiplatinum collection from Bad Company pulls ten timeless classic rock hits from the group’s first six albums.

Former Free (“All Right Now”) lead singer Paul Rodgers and former Mott the Hoople guitarist Mick Ralph had the success of their new band, Bad Company, almost guaranteed. Rodgers’s rough growl and Ralph’s simple and sustained power chords came together to make some of the most popular hard rock of the ’70s. “Can’t Get Enough” added a bit of boogie to the formula, while “Feel Like Makin’ Love” and “Ready for Love” slowed things down a bit. As a rule the band packed the most wallop with the slower verses followed by the amps-to-ten chorus and endings in their odes to women, whiskey, and song. “Shooting Star,” was standard Bad Company, a slow rocker in the form of a cautionary tale about stardom and excess. The band seemed almost adverse to playing straight-four rockers, despite the power chords and guitar swells. Even in their eponymous track the dynamics ebbed and flowed. Only “Rock ‘N’ Roll Fantasy” carried the same intensity through most of the song. 10 from 6 only makes one error by leaving out the hard rock blues of “Good Lovin’ Gone Bad.” –Steve Gdula

Carrara, Nevada Map

Carrara, Nevada Map
MEET ME AT THE FOUNTAIN

"Meet me at the fountain" was the slogan of Carrara, a small town located in one of Nevada’s hottest and driest regions—the Amargosa Desert. Separated from California’s Death Valley by the foreboding Funeral Range, the little community sweltered through long hot summers, only to be buffeted by icy winds during the short winters. Carrara, an unusual town in an adverse setting, existed for a singular purpose—to provide the employees of the American Carrara Marble Company with all the comforts of a home town. In the year 1912, this was no mean feat. Young, energetic Park V. Perkins, formerly a mine-machinery salesman, undertook the development of the quarries and townsite after a year of drilling had disclosed vast marble deposits in the Bare Mountains. The American Carrara Marble Company was quickly formed and the stripping of the overburden on the proposed quarry sites begun. By 1913, the development of the townsite was underway and a new project "was in the offing—a three-mile, cable railway. It had become apparent that a means of transportation was needed to haul the fifteen-ton marble blocks down to the mill. A route was surveyed and once again the desert showed its capriciousness by a delaying action. Due to the heat and haze the instrument work was limited to less than two hours a day—4:30 a.m. to 6:00 a.m. Under Perkins’ capable directions, conditions were soon "go" at the townsite. Considerable publicity was given to scheduled "Townsite Celebration" to be held on May 8, 1913. A tree-lined, townsquare had been laid out complete with a 15-foot diameter fountain continuously spurting a 3 to 6 foot column of water. It was an incongruous sight in an arid land, where water was so precious it could mean life or death for men and mines. Having no supply of its own, Carrara’s water was piped nine miles across the desert from Gold Center. The townsfolk were proud of their "square" and the password for Townsite Day soon became the town’s slogan. People came for miles via horse and buggy, cars.and train to enjoy the Townsite Day entertainment. The Goldfield Band opened the festivities and a hotly contested baseball game accounted for the afternoon hours. An orchestra played loud and long for an evening of dancing. The lone saloon did a standing-roomonly business; and it is reported that several celebrants christened the fountain by falling in during the evening—but a gay time was had by all! "It was about this time that we moved to Carrara," John Edward Garrett, now a retired Los Angeles County employee, told me. "The town was growing rapidly and the railway was under construction. We first lived up at the quarry where my mother ran the cookhouse. About 30 men were employed and she served them three hearty meals a day." "There were only seven kids," Ed went on to say, "including my sisters Grace and Gladys, and me. The one-room schoolhouse was located in Carrara, and we had to walk the three miles morning and evening. Going down wasn’t so bad, but the grade was fairly steep on the uphill climb." Carrara soon boasted a hotel, ice house, large boarding house, engineering orifice, saloons, postoffice, restaurant, a number of homes and the ever important mill. The railroad was completed in the pring of 1914 and a Lingerwood cable system installed. Two flat cars counterbalanced one another on each trip. The loaded, or down, car helped to pull the empty one up to the quarry. This system required a turnout at mid-point which allowed the cars to pass one another. A power house was located at the quarry and provided the energy needed to operate the electrically-driven machinery. Marble was mined from several quarries in Cambrian limestone and dolomite. A variety of colors was obtained, including the pure white, statutory grade which resembled the famed Carrara, Italy marbles for whom the Nevada deposit was named. Chandler machines cut the marble into 5 to 15-ton blocks which were then subdrilled to release them. A derrick hoisted the blocks aboard the flat car for delivery to the cutting mill where huge saws, fed with mud and water, cut the blocks into one-inch slabs. Finally, they were finished by large polishing machines. The first shipment of marble was made in April of 1914. Carrara’s most productive years began with the first shipment and lasted through 1917. The company payroll rose to about 70 and the buildings in town numbered in the 50s. A weekly newspaper, The Obelisk, circulated the local news with Arthur B. Perkins, brother of the town’s founder, as editor. He also ran several other businesses including the boarding house and company office. A recent talk with Mrs. Arthur (Marhousewife’s problems. "Supplies were very and were lucky if it weighed 25 pounds difficult to obtain," she told me. "After the upon arrival." Mrs. Perkins continued, ice house closed down it was almost im- &qu

Bubblers Medley – 23

Bubblers Medley - 23
1611.

" THE BUBBLERS MEDLEY, or a SKETCH of the Times : Being
Europe’s Memorial for the Year 1720." (No. 2.)

" Si Populus vult Decipi, Decipiatur"

Printed for Tho : Bowles, Print 8f Map Seller next y e Chapter House in S l .
Paul’s Ch : Yard London ; where may be had variety of Prints, Maps,
Paintings, frc. [Aug. 10, 1720]

THIS is an engraving of similar general character to that which is described
as (No. 1.), with the same title and date, No. 1610. Its elements are, however,
totally different. A sea piece seems to be, in one part, at the bottom of the
represented pile of engravings ; a landscape is at another part. In the centre,
at the upper portion of the design, is engraved a print of a South Sea speculator
looking between the bars of a prison window, and, with his hands pressed
together, imploring alms. The pot which it was formerly the custom to
suspend from the windows of debtors’ prisons, in order that when a donation
was placed in it by a passer-by it might be pulled up by the beggar, is shown
in this print. Below are the following lines :

" Behold a poor dejected wretch,

Who kept a S-Sea Coach of late,
But now is glad to humbly catch,

A Penny, at the Prison grate.

‘ Tis strange One sett of Knaves should sour,

A Nation f am’ d for Wealth $ Wit,
But stranger still that Men in Power,

Should give a Sanction to the Cheat.

1 In the Department of Prints and Drawings.

416 GEORGE I. [17*0

What ruind Numbers daily mourn,

Their groundless hopes 8f follies past,
Yet see not how the Tables turn,

Or where their Money flies at last.

Fools lost, when the Directors won ;

But now the Poor Directors loose,
And where the S-Sea Stock will run

Old Nick, the first Projector knows"

At the top of the design, on our left, dated May 19, 1720, is a receipt for
lOOOJ, in full for lOOl. in the Capital and Principal Stock of the South Sea
Company.

Next, below, is an engraving showing a man laughing at a browsing ass, and
these lines :

" A Wise Man Laugh’d to see an Ass

Eat Thistles, and neglect good Grass:

But had the Sage, beheld the folly,

Of late transacted in Change Alley ;

He might have seen worse Asses there,

Give Solid Gold, for empty Air,

And sell Estates, in hopes to double

Their Fortunes, by Some worthless Bubble,

Till of a suddain all was lost,

That had so many Millions cost :

Yet ruind fools are highly pleas’d,

To see the Knaves that bit ’em squees’d,

Forgetting where the Money flies,

That cost so many Tears and Sighs."

In the upper corner, on our right, is a print representing " The Stock-
Jobbing Ladies." in a large chamber ; one party conversing eagerly with a
bearded man who is evidently meant for a Jew, another party talks with a
second man. Below are these verses :

" OMbre and Basset laid aside

New Games employ the Fair :
And Brokers all those Hours divide,

Which Lovers used to share.

The Court the Park the foreign Song,

And Harlequins Grimace,
Forlorn ; amidst the City Throng

Behold each blooming Face.

With Jews and Gentiles, undismayed,

Young Tender Virgins Mix ;
Of Whiskers, nor of Beards afraid,

Nor all their Cou’sning Tricks.

Bright Jewels, polished once to deck

The fair One’s rising Breast,
Or sparkle round her Ivory Neck,

Lie pawnd in Iron Chest.

The gentle Passions of the Mind

How Avarice conlroulcs!
Ev’n Love does now no longer jind

A Place in Female Souls."

i 7 ao] GEORGE I. 417

Under this is engraved a letter directed " To (Thom)a,9 Bowles Print Seller
next to the Chapter house S l . Pauls Church Yard Londo(u 1 )" and marked "3",
for the postage.

The knave of spades is in the corresponding place on the opposite side of this
design, to that which is occupied by the letter.

Below it is another print, with an engraving of two horsemen galloping, and
two footmen walking on a country road. A crutch, bottle and tobacco-pipe lie
on the ground near the mounted beggars. Below are engraved the following
lines :

" This evil Solomon espfd,

Among the Rabble-ront,
That Beggers did on Horse-back ride
Whilst Princes walk’d on foot.

South- Sea has verified ye same,

For Mighty Men of late,
Are brought to Poverty Sf Shame

Whilst Scoundrels ride in State"

Below this is "BUBBLE CAR(D)" ; on it is engraved a tree, up the stem
of which many persons are endeavouring to climb, while some, among others who
have reached the branches, fall from them on the ground, or into the sea, which
surrounds it. The tree is propped by beams of wood, a serpent issues from its
trunk. Under the tree are engraved the following verses :

" The Headlong Fools Plunge in South Sea Water.
But the Sly Long-heads ( Wade with caution a’ter) :
The First are Drowning but the Wiser Last,
Venture nor deeper than the Knees or Wast."

Below this is the publication line of the Bubbl

bad company gold map

bad company gold map

10 From 6
Former Free (“All Right Now”) lead singer Paul Rodgers and former Mott the Hoople guitarist Mick Ralph had the success of their new band, Bad Company, almost guaranteed. Rodgers’s rough growl and Ralph’s simple and sustained power chords came together to make some of the most popular hard rock of the ’70s. “Can’t Get Enough” added a bit of boogie to the formula, while “Feel Like Makin’ Love” and “Ready for Love” slowed things down a bit. As a rule the band packed the most wallop with the slower verses followed by the amps-to-ten chorus and endings in their odes to women, whiskey, and song. “Shooting Star,” was standard Bad Company, a slow rocker in the form of a cautionary tale about stardom and excess. The band seemed almost adverse to playing straight-four rockers, despite the power chords and guitar swells. Even in their eponymous track the dynamics ebbed and flowed. Only “Rock ‘N’ Roll Fantasy” carried the same intensity through most of the song. 10 from 6 only makes one error by leaving out the hard rock blues of “Good Lovin’ Gone Bad.” –Steve Gdula